Their Family Bought Land One Generation After Slavery. The Reels Brothers Spent Eight Years in Jail for Refusing to Leave It.

Their Family Bought Land One Generation After Slavery. The Reels Brothers Spent Eight Years in Jail for Refusing to Leave It.
— Read on features.propublica.org/black-land-loss/heirs-property-rights-why-black-families-lose-land-south/

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Kennedy Center honors House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as 2019 Profile in Courage honoree!

Kennedy Center honors House Speaker Nancy Pelosi – Speaker of the House of Representatives of the 116th United States Congress – as the 2019 Profile In Courage Award honoree! She put the national interest above her party’s interest to expand access to health care and, against a wave of political attacks, led the effort to retake the majority & elect the most diverse Congress in U.S. history.

Our Speaker of the House is a lady I truly admire.

This prodigious honor is bestowed on a very deserving person.

Courage, coupled with skill and grace – in abundance.

Again, congratulations Madam Speaker.

US Slave and Union Soldier: The Forks of the Road Slave Market at Natchez, Mississippi

A fraternity brother of mine recently shared this story with me. What a profound black history story about (freed) African-American men who served as defenders of Natchez, Mississippi, in the Union Army from 1863 to 1866. This, after many were previously slaves at this same location in one of the largest and most active – site of the South’s second largest slave market in the 19th century – slave markets in the South and one of the largest in the United States.

His Great Great Grandfather; George McClain, alias George Washington served in the Civil War as a member of Union Company B, United States Color Heavy Artillery . He was one of the 3,000 soldiers that kept the peace in Natchez, Mississippi (FORKS IN THE ROAD).

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NATCHEZ, Miss.–For the 30 years it existed in the 1800s, Forks of the Road was where white dealers sold black slaves unloaded from riverboats docked at Natchez-Under-the-Hill and herded down St. Catherine Street to what was then the town’s outskirts, according to historical accounts.

At its peak, as many as 500 slaves could be found at the market on any given day. It’s believed to have been the second-largest slave market in the South; the biggest was farther down the Mississippi in New Orleans. The two biggest traders shipped more than 1,000 slaves from Alexandria, Va., to the two markets each year beginning in the 1830s. Trade at the Forks of the Road ended only with the Civil War.

IMG_0814_thumb[1]The last newspaper advertisements for slave sales at the Forks of the Road appeared in the Natchez Daily Courier during the early months of 1863. All slave trading had ceased in Natchez by the summer of 1863 when Union troops occupied the town. Today, the historic intersection, with its familiar “Y” configuration, remains to mark the location of the once-flourishing slave markets at the Forks of the Road.

During the Civil War, Natchez remained largely undamaged. The city surrendered to Flag-Officer David G. Farragut after the fall of New Orleans in May 1862.[11]Two civilians, an elderly man and an eight-year-old girl named Rosalie Beekman, were killed when a Union ironclad shelled the town from the River. The man died of a heart attack and Rosalie was killed by a shell fragment. Union troops under Ulysses S. Grant occupied Natchez in 1863; Grant set up his temporary headquarters in the Natchez mansion Rosalie.

Volunteers began to respond, and in May 1863 the Government established the Bureau of Colored Troops to manage the burgeoning numbers of black soldiers. By the end of the Civil War, roughly 179,000 black men (10% of the Union Army) served as soldiers in the U.S. Army and another 19,000 served in the Navy.

Source: US Slave: The Forks of the Road Slave Market at Natchez, Mississippi

https://mississippiriver.natgeotourism.com/content/forks-of-the-road/msp39b830bc4838a7385

https://www.roadtripamerica.com/forum/content.php?2303-Forks-of-the-Road-Natchez-Mississippi

Forks of the Road Slave Market site, Natchez

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60910-d6661548-Reviews-Forks_of_the_Roads_Monument-Natchez_Mississippi.html?m=19905

http://articles.latimes.com/2004/jan/11/news/adna-slaves11

US Slave: The Forks of the Road Slave Market at Natchez, Mississippi

Lucy McBath – Georgia’s 6th Congressional District Miracle

27023340_2079986038905413_6646339981118946822_o - copyThere were so many upsets in this past mid-term election, that it’s hard to keep up with them all.

This story, the story of Lucy McBath stands taller than any of the others in my opinion.  Never in a thousand years would I have thought Georgia’s 6th District would go blue.  The racial makeup of the county in 2010 62.2% White, 25.0% Black, 0.3% Native American, 4.5% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 5.3% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. 14.3% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are several reasons why I marvel at her success by winning this Congressional seat in “red” state Georgia during last year’s mid-term.

First, if you don’t know her story behind why she chose to get into politics in the first place, you should know it because it’s so profound it gives you goose bumps. Her son was brutally murdered at a gas station, while with some of friends, by a white man who said their music was too loud.  The shooter used Florida’s stand-your-ground law as his defense. He was not found guilty of murder in his first trial. In an October 2014 retrial, the shooter was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.

Second, to choose to run in the 6th Congressional District of Georgia was about a gutsy as anything a black person could think of. The 6th District, is an affluent suburb North of Atlanta in Cobb County, mainly white. My old district when I lived in Cobb County Georgia. It’s Newt Gingrich’s old district, Tom Price’s old district, the disgraced Health and Human Services Director appointed by trump.  It was always held by a white male until Karen Handel in 2017.

The story of Karen Handel is unflattering to put it mildly.  While I was living in Georgia, I followed her and her politics very closely.  Briefly, Karen Christine Handel Walker; businesswoman, politician, and member of the United States House of Representatives for Georgia’s 6th congressional district. In 2017, she became the first Republican woman from Georgia elected to Congress after defeating Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff in a special election to fill Tom Price‘s vacancy in Georgia’s 6th congressional district; this special election remains the most expensive congressional race in American history.  In the recent 2018 election, Handel lost the election to a full term to Democrat Lucy McBath.

Handel previously served as Secretary of State of Georgia. A member of the Republican Party, Handel worked in business before entering politics. First elected in 2003, she chaired the Fulton County Board of Commissioners until 2006, and then was elected and served as Georgia’s Secretary of State from 2007 to 2010.

In 2011, Handel was appointed Senior Vice President of public policy at Susan G. Komen for the Cure, a charity in the cause of fighting breast cancer,  and left on February 7, 2012, following the foundation’s controversial decision to eliminate and then later restore funding for Planned Parenthood, an organization to which she was opposed. Handel sought a second term in the 2018 midterm elections but was defeated by Democratic challenger Lucy McBath.

Finally, to beat Karen Handel after Handel trounced John Ossoff in the special election this year for Tom Price’s old seat, is nothing short of miraculous to me.  John Ossoff was a great candidate and ran a great campaign, but even he couldn’t unseat Karen Handel.  Never in a million years would I have thought that district would go blue, not to mention going blue with the seat being won by a black woman.  The districts demographics haven’t changed believe it or not.  It’s still predominantly white and Republican.  What has changed is obviously the number of forward-thinking white voters who decided – in this year of the women – to look beyond their past political biases and cast their ballots for the (best) candidate.  This is very encouraging to say the least.

My only regret is that voted in the district for thirty years and never, nor did I think I would ever have, the opportunity to vote for a man or women of color with the hope of them winning. It took courage – inspired in part by the tragic death of her son I am sure – for her to run and answer her calling to do something to try and help make a difference in our society’s woes.

Now a newly appointed member to House of Representatives 116th Congress Rules Committee by the Honorable Nancy Pelosi and twice elected Speaker of the House of Representatives.  How awesome.

My new hero, Lucy McBath.

 

The Word Of A White Woman Can Still Get Black People Killed

It was true when Emmett Till was lynched, and it’s true today.

www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/opinion-daniels-emmett-till-case_us_5b4e4aace4b0b15aba8972d4

Now Carolyn Bryant is 82 years old, in the “throes” of death, having lived a wonderful life, I am sure. Now she admits she lied about some of statements, but most astonishing of all, she didn’t repent for her part in the death of this young man.

On the witness stand, Carolyn Bryant, the 21 year old wife of Roy Bryant,  had asserted that Till had grabbed her and verbally threatened her. She said that while she was unable to utter the “unprintable” word he had used (as one of the defense lawyers put it), “he said [he had]’”—done something – “with white women before.’” Then she added, “I was just scared to death.”  Emmett Till would be later murdered by two white men, J.W. Milam and his half-brother Roy Bryant, husband of Carolyn Bryant—the country-store owner.  Later she confessed that she had fabricated the most sensational part of her testimony. “That part’s not true,” she told Timothy Tyson, a Duke University senior research scholar and author of the new book,  The Blood of Emmett Till (Simon & Schuster),   about her claim that Till had made verbal and physical advances on her.  Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him.”

This story is very haunting to me because at the time this happened (August 1955), I was five years old the day Emmett Till’s body was found, and pulled from the Tallahatchie River, was August 31, 1955.  I was five years old; nine days shy of my sixth birthday.  I had already been in school a year now, as back then, you could start school at five if your sixth anniversary of your birthday was on or before December of that year.

I remember sitting on the porch as I listened to my mother and several other ladies were talking and I heard my mother say “they pulled that poor boys body from the river this morning.”  Bear in mind I was barely six years old, and even growing up in Mississippi and with all of the ills of racism and Jim Crow so ubiquitous at the time, I didn’t fully comprehend the magnitude of the incident then.  It’s hard for some to believe, especially if you didn’t grow up in the segregated Deep South, but black parents did a really good job of insulating their children from becoming a similar statistic as Emmett Till.  They did so then, as many do now, by having conversations with them about how we “deported” ourselves.  They talked then, as they do now, about how to respond when confronted with angry white men and the need to be extra careful about our interactions with white women.  They knew that even a casual association with white girls and women could cause us great harm, if only due to mere casual acquaintance, or the expected (Southern) gentlemanly courtesies children were expected to display to all adults, white and black.

So, pardon me if I share the same empathy for Carolyn Bryant, and the hell she faces for being a willing co-conspirator – and I don’t use the word lightly – in the death of this innocent young man.  He was eight years older than me, but he and I were in the same general age group.  The number of black men, and children, during the reign of terror by (the) Jim Crow Southern terrorists will never be fully counted, or accounted for.  The number of white women who either through sheer hatred or fear, or both, who knowingly helped to murder black men, then and now, is incomprehensible and unforgivable.

A White Lie Can’t Be So Bad, Can It? – AfroSapiophile

I would like to add that we should not misconstrue the word lynching. In actuality, it has less to do with a rope and more to do with the horror and violence aimed at Blacks throughout America’s racist history. Taking that into account, we can surmise that Blacks are still being lynched to this day. The same racist fundamentals apply to those crimes as they did when Jesse Washington was lynched. It is a racist, heartless murder that warns other members of a group to take heed. No difference. Just because there are no laws that advocate for lynchings does not mean that they don’t take place.

via A White Lie Can’t Be So Bad, Can It? — AfroSapiophile

America – Built on Solid Rock or Sinking Sand

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Long ago, essayist John Jay Chapman addressed it, writing about the earliest days of the Republic, the world of the Founding Fathers and men such as Jefferson, both revolutionary and slaveholder.

He wrote, “There was never a moment,” Chapman wrote, “when the slavery issue was not a sleeping serpent. That issue lay coiled up under the table during the deliberations of the Constitutional Convention. … Thereafter, slavery was always on everyone’s mind, though not always on his tongue.”

Ken Burns reiterated, “It’s very American to presume that all those old guilts can be transformed into reconciliation, reparation and atonement, as in the celebrated story of the slaver who abandoned his errant path and wrote the exquisitely beautiful hymn “Amazing Grace.” But, as the Civil War — and, sadly, our present day — attests, the opposite is also true. Our ancient guilts and animosities more often metastasize into anger, violence and brutality. That’s very American, too.

Even with a century and a half between us and our greatest cataclysm, we have an eerie sense that so much of what seemed safely finished and distant about the war now seems uncomfortably present, palpable, the underlying racial causes of the old conflict on nearly daily display. Too often, it seems, the black lives that were once bound by those shackles still don’t matter.”

This same snake, this vile creature synonymous with hate and bigotry, so representative of the klan, the neo-Nazis, so  trumpian, was there from the beginning and has remained with us all the while.

I think all of us who have been and, who are still recipients of the ugliness, both tangible and intangible, know full well nothing is going to change, because that snake of slavery, of racial hate is still curled up under every table, in every household, in the board rooms, civic halls, halls of Congress and most definitely under the desk in the West Wing of the White house.

It has not been killed, and until it is –if it can be – killed, we will end our lives sitting at these tables (when are allowed too) with our feet tucked well back under the chair, because we know it’s always ready and willing to strike and will bite the hell out of us if it’s disturbed.

Two wars have been fought to eradicate Nazism, the Klan and other forms of racial hate and bigotry. In one (World War II),
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_casualties some 50 to 80 million people total (at least half of them German), 50 to 55 million civilians, 416,000 Americans, were killed in this mother of all previous world wars in an attempt to quell the Nazis, this same snake Chapman spoke of, and all they represented.

In the other, this same racist, bigoted hateful snake couldn’t be killed during the great U. S. civil war in 1861 through 1865, when more than 600 Americans were killed, in a superficial attempt to kill this snake, yet it still lives and even thrives.  The snake is feed, nurtured, pampered and schooled in the wiles of racial hate by its fathers, mothers, grand-fathers and Grandmothers, to remain strong and vibrant and trained to be ready strike at a moment’s notice.

The issues that manifested themselves in Charlottesville is a constant reminder that nothing will change in this country until this country atones itself for the sins and indignities it was founded on – slavery being the most predominant.  You cannot build a building on sand and expect to never have problems with that building. Problems like, cracks in the walls, cracks in the roof, and sinking foundations are things you’re going to have always deal with, but you’ll never eradicate those problems because the building was built on sand.

“My Hope is Built on Nothing Less”
by Edward Mote, 1797-1874

1. My hope is built on nothing less
Than Jesus’ blood and righteousness;
I dare not trust the sweetest frame,
But wholly lean on Jesus’ name.
On Christ, the solid Rock, I stand;
All other ground is sinking sand.

Oh how we wonder why did it choose to rear its vicious head now, why did it choose this moment in time to strike “some” with its poison and cause them to agonize over the sting of its bite as they scream, yell and ask silly ass, idiotic statements like, this is 2017, why is this still happening?  Why is this happening in 2017!  Where the heck have they been?  Some of us wake up each day and go about our business and are totally oblivious to what’s  happening around us.  We know that the people, like the ones who showed up Charlottesville are dispersed in every walk of our lives, yet we are unmindful of this snake because it hasn’t reared its ugly head and struck us an individual.

Keep in mind, that as a country, there is no other country in the world that fought a civil war (for whatever the reason), has so foolishly and blatantly allowed the losing side to so prominently and profoundly display the images (statues) of those individuals who lost said war for all the world to see and bear witness to what they stood for – this idea of wanting to keep another race of people in bondage.  Those of us who are beneficiaries of our ancestors who endured this most horrific act, are asked to walk pass the images in all of our daily comings and goings.

We can’t go to work without passing these racist relics, our kids attend schools named after these slaveholders and war generals, we have cities, towns, public facilities parks, military bases, warships; and every item imaginable staring us in the face as we go about our daily lives.  Take them all down, but we will still have to live, work and recreate with the Neo-Nazis, KKK and white supremacists who are among us.

It’s not an image we need to kill, it’s and idea.  Laws and other social actions and force a sort of change of one’s behavior, but those laws and actions will never change a attitude.

You can modify or change a behavior but you just can’t kill an attitude. 

Carolyn Bryant vs Emmett Till, A Life Ruined vs A Life Taken

emmett-till-carolyn-bryant
Left, a young Emmett Till; Right, Carolyn Bryant with her two sons Roy Jr. and Lamar at Till’s murder trial at the Tallahatchie County courthouse in Mississippi, September 1955. Left, from Bettmann, right, by Ed Clark/The LIFE Picture Collection, both from Getty Images

We live in this life, fearful – of going to hell, hopeful of going to heaven, confused and often compelled, because of these fears, to try and do the right thing.

Yet, it’s difficult to process why any of us would be so afraid of ending up in that place often referred to as hell, when there are people like Carolyn Bryant, J.W. Milam and his half-brother Roy Bryant, all who shared equally in the murder of Emmett Till and hundreds, if not thousands, of young (and old men alike) men like him. Surely, most of us are going to end up in the good place based on how we have lived our lives, as there is no way a person like the aforementioned will have a seat next to us. If they do, then, this whole “after life” thing has been one big lie. They all had the joy and satisfaction of enjoying the thrill of institutional racism and white privilege at its zenith, mostly in the South, but all over these United States and even the world in many respects.

Okay, unless you have capsulized this life-changing story – either from your circumspect study of the history of this horrific, inhuman act of hatred, or your delicate interest in this article – the story is:
http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/01/how-author-timothy-tyson-found-the-woman-at-the-center-of-the-emmett-till-case. 

that, on August 19, 1955—the day before Emmett Till left with his uncle and cousin for Mississippi—Mamie Till gave her son his late father’s signet ring, engraved with the initials “L.T.” The next day she drove her son to the 63rd Street station in Chicago. They kissed goodbye, and Till boarded a southbound train headed for Mississippi. It was the last time they ever saw each other.

Three days after arriving in Money, Mississippi—on August 24, 1955—Emmett Till and a group of teenagers entered Bryant’s Grocery and Meat Market to buy refreshments after a long day picking cotton in the hot afternoon sun. What exactly transpired inside the grocery store that afternoon will never be known. Till purchased bubble gum, and in later accounts he was accused of either whistling at, flirting with or touching the hand of the store’s white female clerk—and wife of the owner—Carolyn Bryant.

Four days later, at approximately 2:30 a.m. on August 28, 1955, Roy Bryant, Carolyn’s husband, and his half brother J.W. Milam kidnapped Till from Moses Wright’s home. They then beat the teenager brutally, dragged him to the bank of the Tallahatchie River, shot him in the head, tied him with barbed wire to a large metal fan and shoved his mutilated body into the water. Moses Wright reported Till’s disappearance to the local authorities, and three days later, his corpse was pulled out of the river.  Till’s face was mutilated beyond recognition, and Wright only managed to positively identify him by the ring on his finger, engraved with his father’s initials—”L.T.”

Now Carolyn Bryant is 82 years old, in the “throes” of death, having lived a wonderful life, I am sure. Now she admits she lied about some of statements, but most astonishing of all, she didn’t repent for her part in the death of this young man.

On the witness stand, Carolyn Bryant, the 21 year old wife of Roy Bryant,  had asserted that Till had grabbed her and verbally threatened her. She said that while she was unable to utter the “unprintable” word he had used (as one of the defense lawyers put it), “he said [he had]’”—done something – “with white women before.’” Then she added, “I was just scared to death.”  Emmett Till would be later murdered by two white men, J.W. Milam and his half-brother Roy Bryant, husband of Carolyn Bryant—the country-store owner.  Later she confessed that she had fabricated the most sensational part of her testimony. “That part’s not true,” she told Timothy Tyson, a Duke University senior research scholar and author of the new book,  The Blood of Emmett Till (Simon & Schuster),   about her claim that Till had made verbal and physical advances on her.  Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him.”

“That case went a long way toward ruining her life,” Tyson contends, explaining that she could never escape its notoriety.  While this an observational assessment made by the author, and I can appreciate his framing the entire episode in such a way so as to highlight the pain experienced (mainly) by both families, on both sides of this horrible tragedy, A life ruined vs a life taken is not quite my idea of how and why my empathy should be shared equally between Carolyn Bryant, Emmett Till and Emmett Till family.

This story is very haunting to me because at the time this happened (August 1955), I was five years old the day Emmett Till’s body was found, and pulled from the Tallahatchie River, was August 31, 1955.  I was five years old; nine days shy of my sixth birthday.  I had already been in school a year now, as back then, you could start school at five if your sixth anniversary of your birthday was on or before December of that year.

I remember sitting on the porch as I listened to my mother and several other ladies were talking and I heard my mother say “they pulled that poor boys body from the river this morning.”  Bear in mind I was barely six years old, and even growing up in Mississippi and with all of the ills of racism and Jim Crow so ubiquitous at the time, I didn’t fully comprehend the magnitude of the incident then.  It’s hard for some to believe, especially if you didn’t grow up in the segregated Deep South, but black parents did a really good job of insulating their children from becoming a similar statistic as Emmett Till.  They did so then, as many do now, by having conversations with them about how we “deported” ourselves.  They talked then, as they do now, about how to respond when confronted with angry white men and the need to be extra careful about our interactions with white women.  They knew that even a casual association with white girls and women could cause us great harm, if only due to mere casual acquaintance, or the expected (Southern) gentlemanly courtesies children were expected to display to all adults, white and black.

So, pardon me if I share the same empathy for Carolyn Bryant, and the hell she faces for being a willing co-conspirator – and I don’t use the word lightly – in the death of this innocent young man.  He was eight years older than me, but he and I were in the same general age group.  The number of black men, and children, during the reign of terror by (the) Jim Crow Southern terrorists will never be fully counted, or accounted for.  The number of white women who either through sheer hatred or fear, or both, who knowingly helped to murder black men, then and now, is incomprehensible and unforgivable.

Emmett Till’s mother and family, like so many hundreds of other black mothers and families have this (sort of) hell they will have to live in, and through, for the rest of their lives.  Those of us who were close to these types of atrocities, both in physical geography and time, will also have this (sort of) hell we will have to live with.

While Carolyn Bryant has a (sort of) hell she’s living through, at least, and unlike Emmett Till, she still lives.

The Repugs Attempt to Repeal and Replace the Affordable Care Act

cow_stepping_in_his_poo_2209835My father used an enormous number of clichés, axioms and old sayings when I was growing up as a kid.

One of my favorites was “it’s like a cow shitting and stepping back in it.” Yesterday, the Repugs inability to pass their long-awaited legislation to “Repeal and Replace Obamacare” is analogous to the cow trying to shake the shit off his hoof/foot after shitting and stepping back in it.  This gross misstep came after seven (7) years of repeated threats, and after taking more than 50 votes in the House of Representatives to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), or the artist known as “Obamacare”.  Of course, keep in mind, that these votes by the House were taken with full knowledge that they didn’t have to worry about repercussions because they knew the President, Barack Obama, whose signature legislation it was in the first place, would simply veto the bill; therefore, they could go about their merry way(s) and blame him for blocking their brave and bold attempt to kill the Frankenstein monster known as Affordable Care Act (ACA), or the artist known as “Obamacare”.

To better understand the repugnance of the saying “shitting and stepping back into it”, you have to understand and appreciate the required misstep one – in this case the cow – has to make, and then understand the anger, frustration, disgust and uncalculated move you (the cow) would have had to make to create this most unfortunate event.

You see, if you have ever had the opportunity to observe four-legged farm animals, be they cows, horses, sheep, goats, etc., or animals in the wild, like elephants, giraffes, lions, or whatever; as they move gracefully through the pasture, or the plains of Africa, you will notice they never step in their own shit.  It doesn’t matter how much shit is on the ground around these animals, they never seem to step in their own shit.  What’s most amazing to me is, these four-legged animals cannot see their feet (certainly not their rear two feet), yet they can walk continuously, going about their way, and never step in the piles of shit that lay in their paths.

However, there are these rare occasions, and rare they are in deed, where the cow will occasionally shit and accidentally step backwards in it.  When this unfortunate occurrence happens, its’ amazing to see how difficult it is for the cow to get the shit off his hoof.  You can also see the dismay on the cow’s face, at the moment this happens.  It’s as though it was saying to itself, dammit, what the hell do I do now.  What the cow does then is to immediately lift the shitty foot in the air and tries to shake off the shit.  Well, if you know anything about getting shit off your shoe, it tops the list of crap that’s seems almost impossible to clean off your shoe – say gum for example.  So, the cow shakes his hoof. and shakes it and shakes it, but to no avail. So the cow just decides to start walking in hopes the shit will just wear off.

So, the cow in this case is the Repugs who, for more than seven (7) years and more than sixty (60) (House) votes later, to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, or the artist known as Obamacare.  In addition, there were countless house seats won by the Repugs during the last two (2) Midterms – and most recently the pathological liar name trump – all won by the Repugs because they campaigned on this one enormous lie – they would repeal and replace  the Affordable Care Act, or the artist known as “Obamacare.”

The shit in this case is the monumental, colossal failure on Friday to garner enough votes to get their inhumane health care bill through a vote in the House.  As in the case of the cow, the Repugs immediately began trying their damnedest to shake the shit of their embarrassing – egg in your face – setback, using selective finger-pointing, first at each other, then the Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan, then at the Freedom Caucus, then at the Dems, then on the weather, then on Sponge Bob, etc, etc.

But guess what, like the cow, cleaning the shit off their hoofs will be most difficult, and, even if they can, the smell of shit will remain on them for a long while.

TV Reporters, grinning like a Cheshire Cat

cheshirecat_disneyGrowing up, my father would often use the phrase “grinning like a Cheshire Cat”, when he wanted to make the, not so flattering, point about a stupid, dim-witted  and otherwise display of adulation by someone, for someone else.

The display of adulation part of his use the phrase is the part I have long held as the most applicable definition when I look at and think about their grin, as one like that of the Cheshire Cat.